Errors, or mistakes, are part of the human experience. Nearly every part of our daily lives carries a risk of error, with results that fall along a continuum of no harm to tragic outcomes. Yet, despite our best efforts in our daily lives, we make mistakes or we are the victims of mistakes made by others; thus, mistakes also are a part of our professional lives. Despite conscientious attention and care by skilled, well-educated, and careful nurses, along with thoughtful use of sophisticated technology, following specific safety protocols, and relying on and continually improving clinical safety programs aimed at preventing medication administration errors (MAEs), these errors and near-misses still happen to patients.1–3  How we choose to ethically respond, both individually and collectively (eg, as an individual unit or as the profession of nursing), when MAEs or near-miss medication errors occur...

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