Whereas the term chronic critical illness is reserved for patients who require more than 21 days of mechanical ventilation or who have been discharged from the intensive care unit (ICU) after requiring at least one lifesaving technology,1–3  the walls of the ICU are no longer the boundaries for where critically ill people are treated and cared for.4,5  Those with chronic, debilitating, incurable illness now commonly are found outside the ICU, with intermittent admissions to ICU for critical illness. Some posit that it is our duty as critical care nurses to seek to understand what patients and families experience once they leave our care and to advocate on their behalf when necessary. The patient–nurse relationship built through the crisis of critical illness allows us to gain a unique knowledge of the patient’s goals, preferences, and values over time....

You do not currently have access to this content.