The frequency of early repolarization in the general population is approximately 5%, but this may vary with age, sex, race, and the criteria used to define the term.1,2  Early repolarization commonly is identified on an electrocardiogram (ECG) by the presence of a J wave, J point elevation, and tall symmetrical T waves with concave ST segment elevation in 2 contiguous leads. Historically, early repolarization has been considered a benign normal variant observed most commonly in the left precordial leads and is most prevalent in athletes and adolescents.1–3  Early repolarization is also more common in African Americans than in other races.1–3  Recently, there have been reports of an association between early repolarization and idiopathic ventricular tachycardia, especially in the presence of J waves and horizontal ST-segment depression.1,4,5  In addition, there...

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