Implantation of a long-term ventricular assist device (VAD) has become a standard treatment option for patients with advanced heart failure (HF). In recent years, the demand for VAD therapy has consistently increased as a result of the high prevalence of risk factors for HF (eg, coronary artery disease, hypertension, obesity), the aging population, and a decreased pool of heart donors.1,2  Long-term implantable VADs are used as a bridge to heart transplantation or a permanent alternative to transplantation (ie, destination therapy) for individuals who are not eligible for heart transplantation because of conditions such as malignancy, morbid obesity, and severe kidney disease. Whether the VAD is implanted as a bridge or alternative to a transplant, multiple studies have shown that the quantity and quality of life for patients with a VAD are significantly higher than for patients with HF...

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