For the past 10 to 12 years, most nursing students have been exposed to simulation learning modalities before they graduate from either their initial licensure or advanced practice degree programs. These simulation modalities typically include high-fidelity manikins, procedural task trainers, standardized patients (or trained medical actors), and computer-based applications. Large academic programs are increasingly experimenting with emerging technologies such as virtual reality and augmented reality in order to provide greater realism within the learning environment. The use of simulation modalities continues to expand as technological applications improve and provide enhanced physical, emotional, and environmental realism.1-3 

Simulation in the academic arena is generally used to teach students skills and to allow educators to perform assessment. Institutions that have affiliated preprofessional programs, such as in nursing, medicine, pharmacy, and others, often provide opportunities for students to engage in interprofessional simulations that focus...

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