Necrotizing fasciitis (NF) is a life-threatening condition characterized by infection of the subcutaneous tissue. The condition may or may not be visible on the exterior of the body. The incidence of NF varies by geographic location. In the United States, the incidence is reported to be 40 cases per 1 million person-years, which makes this diagnosis fairly infrequent. However, the mortality associated with NF is significant, at 4.8 deaths per 1 million person-years, with approximately 12% of patients who are diagnosed with the infection being at risk for death. Necrotizing fasciitis carries a high mortality rate because of its ability to progress rapidly while evading detection, making rapid identification in high-risk patients important to ensure optimal clinical outcomes. Limb amputation is the most common complication, with an overall rate of approximately 10%. However, data on NF-associated amputation rates within the United...

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