Pediatric intensive care unit clinicians care for critically ill children with a variety of diagnoses; however, one common characteristic among these patients is the use of a central line catheter. Central line–associated bloodstream infection (CLABSI) is a significant source of morbidity and mortality for hospitalized patients, associated with a 12% to 25% risk of mortality1,2  and an extended length of stay of up to 24 additional days. CLABSI is also a national concern because it contributes to increasing health care costs. Intensive care patients have a high risk of CLABSI because of factors including frequent insertion and accessing of multiple catheters, severity of illness, prolonged catheter usage, and the fact that the catheter may have been placed in an emergency situation.4,5  For pediatric patients, pediatric intensive care exposure is an independent risk factor for developing CLABSI....

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