Mr T. was a 71-year-old Caucasian male admitted to the hospital with new-onset shortness of breath. The patient had no documented past medical history and had not seen a physician throughout his adult life. He was a nondrinker but admitted a history of cigarette smoking that began at age 10. Up until several weeks prior to admission, he continued to smoke 2 packs of cigarettes per day. Two to three weeks prior to admission, the patient, who was normally regularly active, noticed dyspnea on exertion. As the dyspnea with exertion worsened over the next several days, he became more concerned. He reported that “I figured I better stop smoking for this breathing problem to get better.” After a week of no smoking, the shortness of breath did not improve. At the urging of his wife, he reluctantly presented to a local urgent care...

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