This study explored the energy expenditure and effectiveness of simulated chest compressions during cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) performed by 36 nurses and 20 male emergency medical technicians. Three different rescuer positions were compared: floor-kneeling, standing, and bed-mount (ie, kneeling on the edge of the bed mattress). Oxygen consumption and spinal kinetics also were assessed. Motions of the lower limbs and pelvis were assessed with an electromagnetic tracking device, and ground reaction forces were measured with a force plate. Muscle moment and power at the lumbosacral joint were determined.

The study results demonstrated that 80% of the simulated chest compressions delivered by male rescuers were effective, whereas only 40% of compressions delivered by female rescuers were effective. A positive correlation was found between effective compressions and oxygen consumption in both the standing (r =0.42, P =.04) and bed-mount positions (...

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