Enteral feeding has been practiced for more than 3500 years. The earliest records document the use of reeds by the ancient Egyptians, Indians, and Chinese to supplement nutrition with various elements, such as wine, milk, whey, and barley.1,2  During World War I, enteral techniques were used to force-feed prisoners on hunger strikes.3,4  In the latter context, enteral feeding was often regarded as inhumane and brutal.3,4  It was not until the 1960s and 1970s that the use of enteral feeding for nutritional supplementation in medical settings became widespread. During the 1980s, percutaneous endoscopic gastrostomy (PEG) tubes were used to enable enteral feedings in adults. Before this, the PEG tube procedure had been limited to pediatric units for feeding neurologically impaired infants. Nasoduodenal tubes and nasogastric tubes currently are used in intensive care units...

You do not currently have access to this content.