About 4.4 million nurses practice in the United States. Lengthy shifts, demanding workloads, and under-staffing are common. Critical care nurses also face complex clinical environments, high-acuity cases, advanced technology, and exposure to environmental stressors (noise, lights), traumatic events, and ethical issues—all of which may have a negative impact on nurses’ physical and psychological health and well-being.1–4  In a prepandemic survey, more than half of responding critical care nurses reported suboptimal levels of physical and mental health, and many were experiencing some degree of stress, anxiety, and depressive symptoms and lower professional quality of life (QOL). These findings illustrate how workplace demands may have a negative impact on the well-being of health care professionals (HCPs), threatening the quadruple aim: high quality care, reduced health care costs, enhanced patient experience, and improved clinician satisfaction.6,7 

During the COVID-19 pandemic, stress and exhaustion reached unprecedented levels and...

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