The authors identify variables predictive of complications related to use of 2 closure devices, so that screening procedures and standards of care can be modified.

Transfemoral percutaneous coronary procedures have evolved in the past several years as a mainstay in both diagnostic and interventional cardiology. However, safe management of vascular access sites after removal of percutaneous catheters remains a serious concern. Manual compression of the site, the traditional method for closure of the femoral artery, is associated with a complication rate of up to 5%, marked discomfort and immobility for patients, and prolonged hospitalization.11,22 New techniques for management of vascular access sites after diagnostic or interventional transfemoral percutaneous coronary procedures have been introduced to increase patients’ comfort and promote a safe recovery. Specifically, new vascular closure devices approved by the Food and Drug Administration...

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