The pharmacological approach to treating patients with acute decompensated heart failure has centered on intravenous diuretics, inotropic agents, and vasodilators. As presented in this case study, nesiritide is the newest agent available for treating patients with acute decompensated heart failure.

Nearly 1 million Americans are hospitalized with heart failure each year, and this cardiac problem is the most frequent cause of hospitalization in patients more than 65 years old.1 The costs of hospitalizations for acute decompensated heart failure (ADHF) have reached almost $25 billion annually, and the rate of readmission after discharge is high.2 Historically, the pharmacological approach to treating patients with ADHF has centered on the use of intravenous diuretics, inotropic agents, and vasodilators. Nesiritide, a recombinant form of B-type natriuretic peptide, is the newest agent available for treating patients with ADHF. I report a case...

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