This is an excellent book for anyone interested in a close examination of the unique ethical problem, moral distress. Often confused with terms like burnout and compassion fatigue, moral distress refers to the specific experience of feeling compelled to act in a manner contrary to personal or professional values; in other words, feeling unable to do what you believe is right. Moral Distress in the Health Professions summarizes what we understand about moral distress, 30 years after it was originally identified, and describes the further work needed to address this pervasive problem. Notably the text draws not only on nursing literature but also examines moral distress from the perspective of other health professionals, such as social workers and physicians, and includes work done outside the United States. One chapter offers a new and broader definition of this experience and additional chapters describe the...

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