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Published: 01 February 2020
Figure 1 The feeding tube with balloon and wire-reinforced wall is shown with the stylet partially retracted. Figure 1. The feeding tube with balloon and wire-reinforced wall is shown with the stylet partially retracted.
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Published: 01 February 2020
Figure 2 The silk thread is used to deflect the tip of the feeding tube downward, avoiding nasopharyngeal trauma. Figure 2. The silk thread is used to deflect the tip of the feeding tube downward, avoiding nasopharyngeal trauma.
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Published: 01 February 2020
Figure 3 When the balloon is inflated upon insertion of the tube to the 30-cm depth mark (in the middle of the esophagus), the patient’s oxygen saturation measured by pulse oximetry should not drop. If the tube has been inserted into the trachea, oxygen saturation will drop by at least 5 percentage points. Figure 3. When the balloon is inflated upon insertion of the tube to the 30-cm depth mark (in the middle of the esophagus), the patient’s oxygen saturation measured by pulse oximetry should not drop. If the tube has been inserted into the trachea, oxygen saturation will drop by at least 5 percentage points.
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Published: 01 February 2020
Figure 4 When the feeding tube with balloon has been inserted to the 70-cm depth mark, the stiff stylet must be gradually removed as the tube is inserted farther. Figure 4. When the feeding tube with balloon has been inserted to the 70-cm depth mark, the stiff stylet must be gradually removed as the tube is inserted farther.
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Published: 01 February 2020
Figure 5 The feeding tube with balloon is secured at the nose when it has been inserted to the 100-cm depth mark, leaving enough length inside the stomach to allow for distal migration by the effect of peristalsis on the balloon. Figure 5. The feeding tube with balloon is secured at the nose when it has been inserted to the 100-cm depth mark, leaving enough length inside the stomach to allow for distal migration by the effect of peristalsis on the balloon.
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Published: 01 February 2020
Figure 6 Warm water or motility agents stimulate peristalsis to advance the feeding tube balloon distally. Figure 6. Warm water or motility agents stimulate peristalsis to advance the feeding tube balloon distally.
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Published: 01 February 2020
Figure 7 A radiograph obtained 30 minutes after feeding tube insertion shows that the tube has migrated into the proximal jejunum. Figure 7. A radiograph obtained 30 minutes after feeding tube insertion shows that the tube has migrated into the proximal jejunum.
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Published: 01 February 2020
Figure 8 Radiographs show a tube coiled in the stomach 30 minutes after placement (left) and migrated into the jejunum 12 hours after placement (right). Figure 8. Radiographs show a tube coiled in the stomach 30 minutes after placement (left) and migrated into the jejunum 12 hours after placement (right).
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Published: 01 February 2020
Figure 9 The feeding tube with balloon (right) has a spiral wire lining the inner surface of the tube to prevent kinking and occlusion. A traditional tube (left) easily kinks and becomes occluded at curves. Figure 9. The feeding tube with balloon (right) has a spiral wire lining the inner surface of the tube to prevent kinking and occlusion. A traditional tube (left) easily kinks and becomes occluded at curves.
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Published: 01 February 2020
Figure 2 Correlation between the Richards-Campbell Sleep Questionnaire (RCSQ) score and the visual analog scale (VAS) score ( r = .514, P = .001). Figure 2. Correlation between the Richards-Campbell Sleep Questionnaire (RCSQ) score and the visual analog scale (VAS) score (r = .514, P = .001).
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Published: 01 February 2020
Figure Common approaches to transcatheter aortic valve replacement: transfemoral (left), transaortic (middle), and transapical (right). Figure. Common approaches to transcatheter aortic valve replacement: transfemoral (left), transaortic (middle), and transapical (right).
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Published: 01 February 2020
Figure 1 12-Lead electrocardiogram of junctional ectopic tachycardia with 1:1 retrograde P-wave conduction. Retrograde P waves are marked in lead V 3 . Figure 1. 12-Lead electrocardiogram of junctional ectopic tachycardia with 1:1 retrograde P-wave conduction. Retrograde P waves are marked in lead V3.
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Published: 01 February 2020
Figure 2 12-Lead atrial electrocardiogram of augmenting atrial activity in junctional ectopic tachycardia with atrioventricular dissociation with more QRS complexes than P waves. P waves are marked with arrows. Figure 2. 12-Lead atrial electrocardiogram of augmenting atrial activity in junctional ectopic tachycardia with atrioventricular dissociation with more QRS complexes than P waves. P waves are marked with arrows.
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Published: 01 February 2020
Figure 3 Algorithm of characteristics that favor junctional ectopic tachycardia compared with other dysrhythmias. Figure 3. Algorithm of characteristics that favor junctional ectopic tachycardia compared with other dysrhythmias.
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Published: 01 February 2020
Figure 4 Junctional ectopic tachycardia treatment algorithm. Figure 4. Junctional ectopic tachycardia treatment algorithm.
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